August Holiday Activities

August 2014

Five days after our girls from Mount of Olives College Kakiri (MOCK) went on holiday, the Valvisions Foundation team travelled to the undulating countryside of Kapchorwa to meet with them and their parents. The meeting was to discuss the girls’ academic performances to date and to interface with their parents. The girls and their guardians were delayed by a heavy downpour that morning which made their journey on the unpaved roads an arduous trip but they were all cheerful, excitedly greeting the VF team. 

It was quite obvious that the holiday was doing the girls some good. Taking a break from the meeting, the girls laughed and played on the green lawns of the hotel. They also posed playfully for the camera as they tried to outdo each other in striking the best pose. 

All the parents reported that they have noticed many positive changes in their daughters ever since the girls were sponsored by VF to attend high school. They said the girls are helpful at home, doing the daily household chores and helping out with farming. Most of the households in Kapchorwa carry out small-scale farming, largely for subsistence. A few homes also own livestock like a cow or goat, which is usually kept for its milk and sometimes for its meat. 

The girls eagerly recounted that they had already started on their holiday homework. All but one of them have to study using hurricane lamps at night. Only Emma Nawezi lives in a home powered by solar energy. Since their academic performance was not as great as expected, the girls’ parents and guardians promised to make more time for them to study during the holiday so they can improve on their grades next term, which is the last term of the year. 

The girls are now looking forward to their first ever trip out of Uganda next week when they travel to Meru in Kenya for a workshop campaign against FGM. The girls will be meeting with Kenyan girls from the Meru, Maasai and Pokot tribes for the first time. The parents were very excited by the opportunity presented to their daughters. Most of them have never been outside Uganda themselves and they listened attentively as VF explained to them what the trip entailed and what were the expected outcomes. Hopefully, after interacting with the Kenyan girls, the Ugandan girls will be able to relate more confidently with each other and with the rest of their schoolmates.

Comments are closed.

Go Back